Lord Shiva

In the Hindu mythology, Lord Shiva is the Destroyer and the most important one in the Holy Trinity, the other two being Brahma the Creator and Vishnu the Protector. Lord Shiva has always fascinated his followers by his unique appearance: he has not two but three eyes, has ash smeared all over his body, has snakes coiled up around his head and arms, wears tiger and elephant skin, leads a wild life in the cremation grounds far removed from social pretenses, and is known for his proverbial anger.

Lord Vishnu

He has four arms and is male: The four arms indicate his all-powerful and all-pervasive nature. His physical existence is represented by the two arms in the front, while the two arms at the back represent his presence in the spiritual world. The Upanishad Gopal Uttartapani describes the four arms. Title has been given since some of these facts may be shocking for someone, soothing for devotees and interesting for others. Some of these facts may be known to someone but unknown to other.

Lord Brahma

In Hinduism, Lord Brahma is the first god of the Trinity (Brahma, Vishnu, and Mahesh). He is the creator of the universe. But, he is not worshipped as Lord Vishnu and Shiva. There is only one temple dedicated to him, which is the Pushkar temple of Rajasthan. And many temples are dedicated to Vishnu and Shiva. There is no corner of India where there are no temples of Vishnu and Shiva.

Sri Kumara Kottam Temple – Kanchipuram

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About Temple

Sri Kumara Kottam temple is located in Kanchipuram, one of India’s seven “Moksha-puris” or sacred cities where salvation may be obtained. It is just half a kilometre to the northwest of the bus stand, on the west Raja Street at the north end of which is the Sankara Matham and at the south end is the Kachapeswarar Temple.

In this temple, the sacred Kanda Puranam in praise of Lord Muruga was composed by the saintly scholar Kachiappa Sivachariyar. According to the account of Kachiappa, each day he would write his inspired account of the career of Lord Murugan or Skanda, and in the evening deposit his day’s work in the mûlasthânam of Lord Subrahmanya at Kumara Kottam. Each night, miraculously, the Lord Himself would modify Kacciappa’s manuscript with His own corrections. Hence, the Kanda Puranam is considered to be the absolutely authoritative account of Lord Murugan’s career bearing the seal of approval of none other than the Lord Himself.

According to mythology, Lord Muruga punished Lord Brahma for his ignorance of the meaning of the Pranava mantra, by a hard knock on his vortex with His fist and then imprisoned him. Later, He assumed the Creation duties of Lord Brahma. In this Kumara Kottam Temple, Lord Muruga installed himself in the sanctum in the ‘Creator’ (Brahmasasta) form.

A noteworthy feature is that all the deities of Kanchipuram, when they come out in procession during festivals pass before Kumara Kottam Temple invariably.

The scholar saint Arunagirinathar, who authored the ‘Tiruppugazh’ in praise of Lord Muruga, has composed the Tiruppugazh song ‘Arivilappittar’ eulogising Lord Muruga presiding over this temple.

The early 20th century saint Pamban Swamigal, who did not know the exact location of the Kumarakottam Temple, was guided to this temple by Lord Muruga Himself who assumed the form of a small boy.

The location of the Kumara Kottam Temple between Sri Ekambereswarar Temple and Sri Kâmâkshi Amman Temple reminds devotees of the Somaskanda form in which Muruga sits in between Parvati and Parameswara.

Every Tuesday and every Krittikai is very auspicious to pray in this temple. The two most important festivals celebrated in this temple are Skanda Shashti immediately after Deepavali in October/Novermber and Vaisaka Festival in April/May every year.

The clean upkeep of this temple and the devout pujas performed by the priests are commendable features. The picturesque paintings on the walls of the temple in the inner periphery around the sanctum area rare treat to the eyes of devotees

HOW TO GET THERE

Air : Chennai is the nearest airport to Kanchipuram. One can take flights for most of the important Indian cities and important cities abroad from Chennai.

Rail : Trains for Kanchipuram are available from Chennai, Chengalpattu, Tirupati, and Bangalore.

Road : Kanchipuram is 75-km away from Chennai and is well connected by a network of roads. There are frequent buses from the city to Chennai, Bangalore and other places. For local transportation bicycles can be hired from the shops near the bus stand. Cycle Rickshaws and auto rickshaws are also available on hire to move in and around the city.

WHERE TO STAY
Accommodation is available at the moderate class and small budgeted hotels, lodges and choultries in Kanchipuram.

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