Lord Shiva

In the Hindu mythology, Lord Shiva is the Destroyer and the most important one in the Holy Trinity, the other two being Brahma the Creator and Vishnu the Protector. Lord Shiva has always fascinated his followers by his unique appearance: he has not two but three eyes, has ash smeared all over his body, has snakes coiled up around his head and arms, wears tiger and elephant skin, leads a wild life in the cremation grounds far removed from social pretenses, and is known for his proverbial anger.

Lord Vishnu

He has four arms and is male: The four arms indicate his all-powerful and all-pervasive nature. His physical existence is represented by the two arms in the front, while the two arms at the back represent his presence in the spiritual world. The Upanishad Gopal Uttartapani describes the four arms. Title has been given since some of these facts may be shocking for someone, soothing for devotees and interesting for others. Some of these facts may be known to someone but unknown to other.

Lord Brahma

In Hinduism, Lord Brahma is the first god of the Trinity (Brahma, Vishnu, and Mahesh). He is the creator of the universe. But, he is not worshipped as Lord Vishnu and Shiva. There is only one temple dedicated to him, which is the Pushkar temple of Rajasthan. And many temples are dedicated to Vishnu and Shiva. There is no corner of India where there are no temples of Vishnu and Shiva.

Ekambareswarar Temple – Kanchipuram

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Ekambareswarar Temple – Kanchipuram

 

Ekambareswarar Temple is one of the famous Hindu temples dedicated to Lord Shiva, located in Kanchipuram in the state of Tamilnadu, India.
It is one of the five major Shiva temples or Pancha Bootha Sthalams (each representing a natural element) representing the element – Earth. The other four temples in this category are Thiruvanaikaval Jambukeswara (water), Chidambaram Natarajar (ether), Thiruvannamalai Arunachaleswara (fire) and Kalahasti Nathar (wind).
It is also one of the 108 Divya desam for Vaishnavites. All of the four revered Saivite Saints have sung the glory of this temple.

istory

This ancient temple has been in existence even prior to 600 AD and has been sung by the revered Saivite Saints. Second century AD Tamil poetry speaks of Kama kottam, and the Kumara kottam (currently the Kamakashi Amman temple and the Subramanya temple). The existing structure then, was pulled down and rebuilt by the Pallava Kings. The Cholas who came in later also made several contributions to the temple.

Temple

No separate shrine for Parvati exists here (as in other Shiva temples in Kanchipuram).
There is a small shrine for Lord Vishnu named Thiru Nilaaththingal Thundathan. Here, the Lord Vishnu is prayed as Vamana Murthy.

Architecture

The temple covers an area of over 40 acres. Reaching a height of 57 meters, the temple’s Raja gopuram (the entrance tower to the temple) is one of the tallest in South India and was built by the Vijayanagar King, Krishnadevaraya.

One notable feature of the temple is the Aayiram Kaal Mandapam, or the “hallway with a thousand pillars”, which was built by the Vijayanagar Kings. The temple’s inner walls are decorated with an array of 1,008 Siva lingams.
The sthala-virutcham is a 3,500 year old mango tree whose branches are said to yield four different types of mangoes.

Legend

Legend has it that once Parvati was doing tapas under this Mango Tree.
In order to test her devotion Lord Shiva sent fire on her. Goddess Parvati prayed to her brother, Lord Vishnu. In order to save her, he took the Moon from Lord Shiva’s head and showed the rays which then cooled down the tree as well as Parvati.

After that, Lord Shiva again sent the river Ganga to disrupt Parvati’s tapas. Parvati devi prayed to Ganga and convinced her that both of them are sisters and should not harm her. And so Ganga did not disturb her penance after that. Then Parvati made a Shiva Linga out of sand and got united with Lord Shiva.
According to another legend, it is believed that Parvati worshipped Shiva in the form of a Prithivi Lingam (or a Lingam improvised out of sand), under a mango tree. Legend has it that the neighboring Vegavati river overflowed and threatened to engulf the Shiva Lingam and that Parvati or Kamakshi embraced the Lingam. Shiva touched by the gesture materialized in person and married her. In this context he is referred to as Tazhuva kuzhainthaar (”He who melted in Her embrace”) in Tamil

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